Jim Bedard #tbt

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I was fortunate enough to stumble upon this classic shot of Jim Bedard in the Niagara Falls Sports Hall of Fame located at the brand new Gale Center Complex in Niagara Falls.  Beyond listing all of Jimmy’s outstanding accomplishments as a goaltender, this photo highlights something he’s not as known for; that beautiful flowing mustache.

Having played professionally from 1977-1992, starting with the Washington Capitals and finishing his career in Finland, Jim is currently the goalie coach with the Detroit Red Wings and will be working with CHE at the Goalie Camp July 29 – August 3 in beautiful Kelowna, BC. (spots still available)  Though you won’t get to see that fantastic duster, or his flowing hair, you can get a glimpse of the demeanor and expertise Jim brings to his coaching clinics by watching the following link. Click Here.

Graydon Crowley

Canadian Hockey Enterprises

1933 Cup Finals #TBT (click to watch)

Finally some action I can follow.  In this brief clip of game 4 of the 1933 Stanley Cup finals between the Toronto Maple Leafs and New York Rangers, the first thing I noticed was how slow everything happens.  You can still see the grit and determination necessary to win the cup, but the action itself moves at a pace that could be followed by a first time viewer.

I’ve played hockey my entire life at various levels and now work at a hockey company and get to see what all of the kids coming up are doing now.  That said, I had a hard time following the play during the recent cup finals; it was just too fast.  With all of the positive advancements in equipment technology and rule changes brought in to make the game more exciting, I fear they’ve created a game too quick for a non-hockey fan to get a grasp of.  Perhaps its time to bring back FoxTrax to help all of us keep track of what’s going on in the new, superfast NHL.

Graydon Crowley

Canadian Hockey Enterprises

Lord Love a Duck! #tbt

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If you’ve participated in a youth or adult tournament with CHE, you may or may not have noticed that there is always a Lefty Wilson Division.  Since 2002 we’ve made a point of commemorating the great man who graced our office and tournaments with his humor, good nature and wonderful stories.

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Lefty was the trainer for the Detroit Red Wings from 1950-1982 and was instrumental in the adoption of goalie masks, including Terry Sawchuk’s iconic mask covered in stitches.  He also served as the emergency backup goalie and played 3 NHL games; 1 for the Red Wings, 1 for the opposing Toronto Maple Leafs and 1 for the opposing Boston Bruins. As you can see by his closed eyes in the Red Wings picture, he wasn’t terribly fond of getting hit by the puck.

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In 1987 Lefty joined the CHE staff.  He was our designated trainer during tournaments, which primarily consisted of him telling players they weren’t actually hurt and to get back up.  He helped us put together meal tickets in the office, often bruising his hand from the incessant stapling, to the point where we bought him the automatic stapler which we still use today.  More than anything, he provided staff and customers with a never ending string of laughs.  With patented G rated lines such as “go scrub your kilt”, “lord love a duck” and “keep your head up kid” as he raised his left fist and pointed the stub of his right index finger at you.

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Everyone who every knew or met Lefty misses him dearly, especially the staff at CHE.  So if you get a chance today, have a drink in his honor but don’t forget to say his patented toast: “Over the lips and past the gums, look out liver here she comes!”

We miss you Lefty.

Everyone at Canadian Hockey Enterprises

What a Roster!!! #tbt

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Former CHE Camp staffer Jason Callaghan was kind enough to scan and email his copy of the 1995 staff photo for this weeks edition of Throwback Thursday.  Within this photo there’s 2193 NHL games played, 7680 minor pro games played, a couple of Stanley Cup rings, an NHL Rookie of the Year winner, a few Memorial Cup Champions, a Calder Cup Champion, a few European league Champions, and of course, CHE legend and friend Lefty Wilson.  Even 18 years later there’s still 4 people in the photo that work in the office daily, and many of these players still instruct at our camps each summer.

I’d like to thank Jason for sending in the photo and www.hockeydb.com for existing so I could figure all of this stuff out.

Graydon Crowley

Canadian Hockey Enterprises

Introducing Throw Back Thursdays #tbt

In honor of our upcoming hockey camp season, this “Throw Back Thursday” #tbt blog post is a look at the past, WAY in the past, where Canadian Hockey Enterprises started, in Ennismore, Ontario in 1987.

It was small, but the Ennismore location was a great spot to get our start and players such as Mike Fisher, Corey Perry and Jay Harrison learned the basics at these camps.  We may have moved to a two pad arena, added 5 more weeks of programs in Peterborough as well as Lake Placid, Traverse City, Kelowna, Canmore and Whistler, and lost the stunning polyester track suits, but our program and philosophy remains the same; bring in top notch instructors and emphasize the fundamentals of every aspect of the game.

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On-ice instruction in Ennismore, in the ‘80’s…and check out those polyester track suits.  In this picture future stars receive instruction from Mark Freer & Ross Wilson who each played 16 years of professional hockey.

The best part about the Ennismore location was the adjacent soccer and baseball fields.  I can still remember lining up on the fence in the ball field so councilors such as Marty Wilford (Current Assistant Coach with Norfolk Admirals) and Colin Beardsmore (12 years European Pro) could shoot us with a tennis ball machine, or as they called it, dodge ball.

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Here you can see a young Brian Weisenberg (6 years pro) and Cameron Mann (11 years pro) posing with the kids after a rousing game of lacrosse.

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CHE President and General Manager Paul Crowley (right) and Glen Forbes (left) discuss strategy after the first successful summer.

Look forward to some more blasts from the past on #tbt with @CHE_Hockey

Graydon Crowley

Canadian Hockey Enterprises